Dykes To Watch Out For

by DUMP HIM

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Hopey🌈💛🖤☠️
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Hopey🌈💛🖤☠️ I'm so late to the party, but I've never been more ecstatic to buy an album out of the QUEERCORE tag. Thank you, Dump Him, for your masterpiece of punk 💛 Favorite track: What's Yr Deal With Kim?.
salsa/sirasha
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salsa/sirasha it’s impossible for me to pick a favorite track. this album captures so many things that i feel on a daily basis perfectly, and everyone in DUMP HIM are amazing! song for frankie and blinko is so fucking relatable, but so is puritan. and don’t kiss me. and DTWOF.
ArcaneJane ♠️
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ArcaneJane ♠️ Some great songs here. worth checking out for sure. Favorite track: Dykes To Watch Out For.
gwynsanity
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gwynsanity Amazing heartwarming album - some real moving new ballads and some classics with a real pulsing sound - looking forward to the vinyl - I can barely pick a fav track Favorite track: What's Yr Deal With Kim?.
Kevin Quigley
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Kevin Quigley great record even better show get out a see them the drummer is Keith Moon
danmorris
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danmorris I was lucky enough to find this on Bandcamp, and I've now listened to to it like 50 times. It's got perfect punk energy without falling into any punk stereotypes. It's everything I want from high-energy, smart, political-and-personal rock music.
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  • Record/Vinyl + Digital Album

    Our first LP, out on our very own label, Musical Fanzine Records! Comes with the 44 page zine that we made about the record. /200.

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    CD version of DTWOF, complete with the 44 page zine we made about the record! In slim jewel case with tray card, each CD is hand stamped!

    Includes unlimited streaming of Dykes To Watch Out For via the free Bandcamp app, plus high-quality download in MP3, FLAC and more.
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1.
Puritan 01:14
[mattie] Hiding in a bathroom in a french restaurant On the street that Hutchinson prophesied we’re all gonna die, and God will destroy Boston Then was exiled to Bronxville And when it ends that’s where I’ll go [jac] i don’t think that this theology can characterize me i’ve no affliction; it’s yr projection when i leave i’ll be vindicated [mattie] I want to think the episcopalians at park street Don’t mind that though, i look like a boy that’s not what I’m going for Nobody here minds, what the fuck I look like As long as I don’t speak or if I do it’s not about collective bargaining [jac] i know about... this theology... nothing here was made for me. i’ll show you a real affliction.
2.
[Jac] in this room there is a party of people like me a critical mass that’s nothing without some kind of spark we’re back in london, england 1928 doomed to repeat isolation while a well of loneliness pervades. now we’ve got that common language to identify our pain understand a toddler’s lexicon, [but] we only use it to degrade and we all wonder why we feel so alone it’s hard to feel right when we alienate the ones we call home [Chorus, All] i refuse to fucking recreate dichotomies of real and fake what got us here in the first place i refuse to participate expectations of ease, half-hearted praise that got us here in the first place [Otto] Got a number of things to list off In the grand scheme of growing off the binary I check the records, dating back to some other time I look for myself I see it in your photographs What was it like to only get to be yourself In strips of film and black and white negatives? One day they’ll put your name on a ferry boat Your home is now a monument How radical just to document you exist. [Chorus, All] i refuse to fucking recreate dichotomies of real and fake what got us here in the first place i refuse to participate expectations of ease, half-hearted praise that got us here in the first place [Jac] i don’t suppose i’ll ever know what it means to be a man, that’s something i can’t change i don’t suppose i’ll ever know what it means to be a man, i’ll live around it
3.
Unimportant 02:03
this scene engenders envy, you know it’s not my fault. begrudging detachment, and now you’re better off you spot it, microscopic cavil what you can’t create i watch you fall apart and balk at the bait it’s not unimportant but i don’t remember a thing you pull me aside and claim you can’t tell a lie that’s bullshit, you prove it, hide what you devise you’re stunted, you don’t love him, prosaic alibis you want to complain so i’ll take all the blame it’s not unimportant but i don’t remember a thing
4.
Trash 03:51
trapped in a memory to confront a graze of skin. why’s everything that i do always come back to this? it’s not a wound i’ll escape through. back in our bedroom the walls were just too thick no one could hear to care when i could never sleep at night, her absolution came through saturnity and he might not have killed no one but she made up for it inherit, like her trust fund cruelty, getting what she wants by any means — a sense of greed destined to small spaces, backed up into my station, i was ashamed to be like me. so i tasted everything she had, and it made me so sick i’m more than happy being trash. back when i was only 17, i’d never seen georgia. she’d fly me out to get fucked, beset, i was never enough still shoulder shame deep inside destined to small spaces, backed up into my station, i was ashamed to be like me. so i tasted everything she had, and it made me so sick i’m more than happy being trash i can’t remember the love between bouts of crying and now it’s never enough if i can’t tell you why i’m crying
5.
no one here knows what to do. they’re not too good with the follow through. so I lay in bed and watch the rain fall down, listen to Nebraska ‘til the end and turn the record back around did you clear the air yet? i know I’m never here, yes, but are you all there yet? i know, I know, I’m never here. no one here knows what to say, so i talk to Siobhan, like, everyday. let sadness decay and watch the rain fall down, listen to Pacer ‘til the end and turn the record back around.
6.
for the first time in my life i have had something good, a safe home, but i can’t feel like i should when it comes, it’s out of nowhere and no one has done me wrong when it comes, i become a burden to everyone i love (it’s not yr fault) when i fold into myself, i am the only one who can read the pages of my experience, interpret embodiment of memory how do i communicate that nothing’s even wrong? they work to understand, but i think i make it hard (it’s not yr fault)
7.
Ache 01:37
you’ve got an ache, identifiably fake i try to escape while you hyper-fixate maybe i’m better off, but you know i still can’t relate. dragging me down, yeah that’s a cliche. at this point i try not to mention yr name, well, i can’t erase. i’ll spare you the implication at the expense of myself you say it’s a sickness, well, i hope you’re getting help. vilify, refuse to contemplate possible mistakes but keep making yr own, it’s okay laundry list of complaints, a condition i won’t negate, steal yr own bike and you’ll get a ride today i’ll spare you the implication at the expense of myself you say it’s a sickness, well, i hope you’re getting well.
8.
when the rain washes you clean i feel more obscene than ever disembodied monotone, prayers that feelings sever i notice my confoundingness and fall short — finally confess and all my friends are sick of hearing this, in static absence i’ll admit my hesitant rituals, self-punishment an insincere peace of mind, tarot in a trying time: it’s comforting call me heartless or call me honest, i don’t care, it’s clear i’ve lost it on the back road, bleary eyed in august and i wouldn’t do it the same and now what’s the difference? inconspicuous and diffident — a self-inflicted hindrance abetted by distance i will not cry i will not run i will sit with what this has become can i still ameliorate? i dwell and i exacerbate til i abandon myself decline to solicit help, and for once i have nothing to say call me heartless or call me honest, i don’t care, it’s clear i’ve lost it on the back road, bleary eyed in august and i wouldn’t do it the same
9.
lately i can’t look at the sky without thinking about how soon we’ll die i didn’t ask for all this bullshit, a pacific island of plastic but we’re kept deprived of land to provide when everything we know is contrived to force us to feel helpless, to feel like we will die without companies, merchandise, assets, and money how can we stop man-made end time? i wasted most of my life not learning how to survive, around insidious lies panic over now pointless archives, the fragility of our ability to to thrive doomsday prepping in my bedroom, breaking down over what we can’t do yr “progress” kills what we need to revive i wasted most of my life not learning how to survive, around insidious lies; consumption signified (the world’s on fire, better throw her in the water)
10.
[mattie] I came home early and heard that the synth’s back I talked to Briar cause I heard them singing: “I’m sad that my trauma fucked up my intentions To be there for someone I loved who was fading” I like to hear you play with your synth now Play surreptitious music about how “I’m a product of trauma, i feel the water The salt on my jaw, i’m going under” I spent some time in my room without talking To anyone who reminds me of someone Who made me do things I did not want to happen So I didn’t talk to like anyone I guess It isn’t easy to be around people When people have caused all the hell that you’ve been through Though people can care for you best and adore you People will prompt you to panic when they do [jac] sometimes it’s not what i expect it to be you’re not the one who hurt me [mattie] What did you get when you asked for perfection What did you get when they didn’t learn a lesson What did you get when it hurt you to lose them ‘Cause you didn’t wanna have to forgive them I guess that I could live functionally thinking That no one else treats me the way that I treat me And they don’t deserve to think loving me’s easy I don’t wanna die with no friends on a freeway oooooooo o o o o ooooooooooooo o o o ooo i don’t wanna die, don’t wanna die alone oooooooo o o o o ooooooooooooo o o o ooo the worlds gonna end soon, don’t wanna die on a road [jac] sometimes it’s not what i expect it to be you’re not the people who hurt me i fucking wish they rot in hell, but i wish i could love you like i were well

about

“I refuse to fucking recreate / dichotomies of real and fake,” shout all four members of DUMP HIM in unison. “What got us here in the first place.” It’s hooky and muscular, an all-caps refrain that plays out like a mission statement, a centerpiece of “Dykes to Watch out For,” the title track from the Massachusetts queercore group’s debut LP.

Dykes to Watch Out For is an album filled with such cathartic refusals: refusals to perpetuate cycles of harm, to be shamed for who you are, to be satisfied by a world that’s failed you since birth. Throughout, the members of DUMP HIM impressively twist and turn their phrases, puzzle-piecing precise processing of gender dysphoria and queerness into full-speed-ahead melodies — placing the band in a tradition of punk women and queer folks making emotional, poppy music, bands like Longstocking and Team Dresch (who they’ll open for this fall)

Throughout, there are explosive excavations of how trauma from past abuse affects relationships (“Trash”), and reckonings with the aftermath of cutting people out who don’t respect your boundaries (“Ache”). There’s one of the sharpest-ever-written punk-pop indictments of the relationship between capitalism and the climate crisis—“Lately I can’t look at the sky / without thinking about how soon we’re gonna die,” they sing on “Judi Bari Almost Died for Our Sins,” a nod to the Earth First activist framed by the government in her own attack by firebombing. There’s granular, introspective storytelling paired with tear-it-all-down system critique.

On DTWOF, DUMP HIM firmly asserts a collective voice, writing collaboratively as a group for the first time and all singing lead at different points, with a line-up comprised of guitarists/vocalists Jac Walsh (they/them) and Mattie Hamer (she/they), bassist/vocalist Otto Klammer (they/them) and drummer Larz Brogan (they/them). On the title track, Walsh and Otto seamlessly take turns on lead vocals, each singing their own verses, while the whole band sings the chorus. Its an anthem that simultaenously feels searing and celebratory, looking to remnants of the past for guidance on “navigating the creation of one’s own non-binary lesbian identity… and giving others the space to explore their own identities in the same way, whatever they may be,” says Walsh.

“What was it like to only get to be yourself / in strips of film and black and white negatives?” asks Otto, in the second verse, in homage to the prolific late 19th century photographer Alice Austen, who documented herself, her long-term partner and friends in ways that were especially radical in her lifetime. “Her story touches on language surrounding queerness, how she probably like so many of our elders did not identify as anything other than perhaps a gender outlaw,” Otto explains. “It used to be really taboo to document anything like she did. There is so little documentation and history for LGBTQ+ people.”

DTWOF brims with lyrical references to historic queer artists and writers. The album title refers to the Allison Bechdel comic of the same name, while the lyric sheet references Radclyffe Hall’s 1928 novel “The Well Of Loneliness” and Adrienne Rich’s 1976 poetry collection “The Dream Of A Common Language.” The tracklist and lyrics include easter-egg nods to influential lesbians and non-lesbian lesbian icons like Claude Cahun, Dorothy Alison, Stevie Nicks, and Lucinda Williams. “The cover kept with the theme of the record in a very purposeful way,” says Walsh. The collaged art, created in collaboration between the band and Felix O’Connor, incorporates protest photography and images from the Lesbian Herstory Archives. “We wanted the cover to feature archival pictures of lesbians from before we were even born, partly as a way to honor folks who paved the way for us, and partly because of all the references that our songs and titles have to lesbian art and literature.”

DUMP HIM started as Walsh’s solo project in 2015, and then morphed into a loose, rotating cast of friends joining the band here and there (eighteen folks have played in the band, to be exact), slowly settling into the current tight-knit group by 2018. The album was recorded in three days on the North Shore of Massachusetts, at Salem’s Godcity Studio with friend and collaborator Zach Weeks (who also mixed/mastered the record, contributed production tips, and ripped a solo at the end of the title track).

Through DTWOF’s grounding in history, DUMP HIM’s framing of the struggles and shortfallings of queer politics in an era of so-called progress is even more impactful — like when Walsh sings, “Now we’ve got that common language to identify our pain… [but] we only use it to degrade, and we all wonder why we feel so alone?” Or on “Puritan”, when Mattie takes lead vocals and pries into the illusion of acceptance — being afforded space but not too much — “Nobody here minds, what the fuck I look like / as long as I don’t speak or if I do it’s not about collective bargaining,” they sing breathlessly.

Album-closer “Don’t Kiss Me, I’m in Training” ends the record on a subtly devastating note, with Jac and Mattie trading leds, and Briar Lake of the band Printing Shed (who the band quotes in the song) contributing backing vocals. “Don’t wanna die alone / the world's gonna end soon,” Mattie sings. It’s a mid-tempo pop reflection summarizing several of the album’s themes: the difficulty of fully loving the people around you in the aftermath of trauma, the struggle of forging relationships and communities as the world literally crumbles. - Liz Pelly

credits

released August 30, 2019

Out on Musical Fanzine Records + Get Better Records.

You can order a record or CD here. To order a tape, head over to the Get Better Records bandcamp: getbetterrecords.bandcamp.com

All physical copies of DTWOF will include a 50+ page zine about the album made by us, including liner notes, pics, and more.

Lead Guitar & Vocals: Mattie Hamer (she/her + they/them)
Drums & Vocals: Larz Brogan (they/them)
Vocals & Guitar: James Walsh (they/them)
Bass & Vocals: Otto Klammer (they/them)

Recorded & mixed by Zach Weeks on the beautiful north shore of eastern Massachusetts, usa at GodCity in Salem, MA.

Zach Weeks played the solo on Dykes
Briar Lake sang the harmonies on Don't Kiss Me
Mattie sang leads on Puritan & Don't Kiss Me, Otto sang the second verse of Dykes, James sang the rest of the leads, and we each wrote the lyrics we sang.

Front cover collage, back cover drawing, and all design by Felix O'Connor.

"No Stopping Us Now" by Bettye Lane + "Lesbians Rule" by Del LaGrace Volcano photos on the cover taken from the Lesbian Herstory Archives digital collection. Both images used with permission from LHA + the artist, respectively.

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DUMP HIM Northampton, Massachusetts

massachusetts queercore.

currently:
Mattie (she/they)
Larz (they/them)
James (they/them)
AJ (they/he)

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